Radioisotopes in carbon dating


The question of the age of the earth has produced heated discussions on Internet debate boards, TV, radio, in classrooms, and in many churches, Christian colleges, and seminaries. Let’s give a little history of where these two basic calculations came from and which worldview is more reasonable. Of course, the Bible doesn’t say explicitly anywhere, “The earth is 6,000 years old.” Good thing it doesn’t; otherwise it would be out of date the following year.

The age of the earth can be estimated by taking the first five days of creation (from earth’s creation to Adam), then following the genealogies from Adam to Abraham in Genesis 5 and 11, then adding in the time from Abraham to today.

Adam was created on day 6, so there were five days before him. So a simple calculation is: At this point, the first five days are negligible.

(Since this is a decay problem, I expect the constant to be negative.

If I end up with a positive value, I'll know that I should go back and check my work.) In Its radiation is extremely low-energy, so the chance of mutation is very low.

The mass of a neutron is almost identical to that of a proton.