Liquidating business definition dailybuzz dating service


Assets are distributed based on the priority of various parties’ claims, with a trustee appointed by the Department of Justice overseeing the process.

The most senior claims belong to secured creditors, who have collateral on loans to the business.

Choosing liquidation converts the business assets to cash, which is then used to make these payments.

Liquidation may either be compulsory (sometimes referred to as a creditors' liquidation) or voluntary (sometimes referred to as a shareholders' liquidation, although some voluntary liquidations are controlled by the creditors, see below).

In addition, the term "liquidation" is sometimes used when a company wants to divest itself of some of its assets.

If the company remains solvent it can still be controlled by the directors of the company but when it is insolvent, you can place the company in control of a liquidator who will then deal with the aspects of the liquidation or winding up of the company.

Liquidation generally refers to the process of selling off a company’s inventory, typically at a big discount, to generate cash.

In finance and economics, liquidation is an event that usually occurs when a company is insolvent, meaning it cannot pay its obligations as and when they come due. Bankruptcy Code governs liquidation proceedings; solvent companies can also file for Chapter 7, but this is uncommon.