Tech dating


We’re not there yet, but this past April, a Hong Kong designer unveiled his very own humanoid robot that looked remarkably similar to actress Scarlett Johansson.

This blond-haired, green-eyed clone—the tinkerings of a hobbyist—was made from silicon, plastic, and circuit boards rather than flesh and blood.

Headsets took off in 2016, with launches from Oculus Rift, Vive, Daydream View, and PS VR.

But as with apps like Tinder, the most quickly adopted ideas will survive and even redefine how we date whilst others will remain unloved and forgotten on virtual shelves.

Many early starters are those who have simply bolted on existing tech to a successful dating app.

If you wear glasses or are into people who do, try Spex, for example. But whether you’re after a meaningful relationship or just some casual dates, there’s an almost overwhelming number of dating apps from which to choose nowadays.

We set ourselves the challenge of trying as many as we could over the course of six weeks.

The data aims to give a better feel for love than simply a "yes" or a "no" - instead plotting a course which can show the exact peak difference between an, "Okay, I'm interested," and an "Oh yes please! "For a site like ours which is based all around the emotional, long term view of meeting a partner rather than just swipe right or swipe left, this is perfect," he tells us.